MICE in Bhutan

Bhutan is a dream comes true for an organisation that is looking for a new and exciting destination to offer as a special location for Incentive trips, Meetings, Special events, Photo shoots, Location scouting, Conventions, Group arrangements, TV-spot-shoots and Product launches. With its unsurpassed scenery and unique blend of culture Bhutan offers something very different. We can always plan your conferences, seminars and Incentive Groups with special events and programs as per your requirements.

Meetings, Incentives, Conferences & exhibitions

MICE is a type of tourism in which large groups, usually planned well in advance, are brought together for a particular purpose.

The MICE industry has been growing over the past few years into a mature business sector, driven by the globalization and interest where Bhutan is one of the country and we are the only the one who goes with MICE tourism in Bhutan. Probably there is no other country in the world, until within the present day that has been a less Interest than Bhutan and as a natural consequence, probably no one, that there is less generally known about.

Bhutan often known as” lost Shang-Ri-La” is one destination that will fire up the imagination of your delegates. The tourists are connected to different sectors of the tourism and hospitality industry in Bhutan where we are the ONLY one who gives interest to their desire and imagination about our country, people, nature and many more. Finding Convention Centres in Bhutan can be quite time consuming but we are the one who helps.

Bhutan – The Land of Happiness!, is not only the last great travel destinations remaining in the world but it is also a great destination for MICE tourism in the world. Bhutan’s pristine environment, scenic beauty and being away from the hustle and bustle from every day life provide the very unique and exotic destination to host conferences or MICE tourism in Bhutan.

We have well-coordinated links with the local and luxury hotels or other the suppliers for organizing conferences or MICE Tourism in Bhutan. We are specialized in this field and we have coordinated many international and local conferences and many others in the Kingdom of Bhutan.

We have committed team of experts in hosting and organizing MICE Tourism in Bhutan. If you are looking to host conferences or MICE Tourism in Bhutan, we are the right company, please do not hesitate to let us know at any time.

The destination is very apt for small MICE groups. Some of the key events suitable to Bhutan are small destination wedding, Anniversary celebration, Birthdays celebration, Team building events, conferences for top managements, and events for top partners or dealers amongst others.

Ideally a 4 to 5 night’s itinerary is most suitable for MICE events in Bhutan. A wide range of activities can be organized to delight the clients. Some of the suggestion is underlined below:

Picnic by the riverside.
Rafting in Punakha.
Cycling from Dochula pass to Punakha.
Game of Archery.
Gala meal events at Bespoke outdoor locations.
Football match at night in Chamlingthang Stadium.
City’s nightlife at local hangouts ( Friday and Saturday open till 1.00 am).
Indoor party (Most of the hotel allows parties till 11.00 pm as per law).
Nature walks and day hikes.
Arrival and departure experiences with Monks.
Lightening of Butter lamps in monastery.
Session with Spiritual Gurus and Talk on Gross National Happiness.
Organization of meeting with government agencies of particular interest.
Charity events for local NGOs.
Sightseeing highlighting points of Interest.

While such events are always challenging and requires constant handholding, Trophel Tours offers end to end solution for all MICE events.

Bhutan is not only the last great travel destinations remaining in the world but it is also a great destination for MICE tourism in the world.

Bhutan’s pristine environment, scenic beauty and being away from the hustle and bustle from every day life provide the very unique and exotic destination to host conferences or MICE tourism in Bhutan.

Bhutan remains one of the safest places in the world for any visitor.

Bhutan is rated as the happiest country in Asia and is based on the philosophy of “Gross National Happiness”

With the growth of infrastructural facilities of high end hotels in Bhutan, we can cater to Annual Corporate Meetings, Seminars, Incentive Holidays, challenging team building and educational school exchange programs.!

We have well-coordinated links with the local and luxury hotels or other the suppliers for organizing conferences or MICE Tourism in Bhutan. We are specialized in this field and we have coordinated many international and local conferences and many others in the Kingdom of Bhutan. Our dedicated staff will coordinate and go that extra mile in making your event an unforgettable experience and a successful one.

History of Bhutan

The name ‘Bhutan’ appears to derive from the Sanskrit ‘Bhotant’ meaning ‘the end of Tibet’ or from ‘Bhu-uttan’ meaning coronation-logo’high land’. Though known as Bhutan to the outside world, the Bhutanese themselves refer to their country as Druk Yul or the Land of the Thunder Dragon. ‘Druk’ meaning ‘Dragon’ and extending from the predominant Drukpa school of Tibetan Buddhism.

The documented history of the Kingdom begins with 747 A.D. with Guru Padsambhava also known as Guru Rinpoche who made his legendary trip from Tibet across the mountains flying on a tigress’s back. He arrived in Paro valley at Taktsang Lhakhang also known as Tiger’s Nest. Guru Rinpoche is not only recognized as the founder of the Nyingmapa religious school but also considered to be second Buddha. In the ensuing centuries, many great masters preached the faith resulting in full bloom of Buddhism by the middle ages. Although sectarian at first, the country was eventually unified under Drukpa Kagyupa sect of Mahayana Buddhism by saint/administrator Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal in the 17th century. Ngawang Namgyal codified a comprehensive system of laws and built a chain of Dzongs which guarded each valley during unsettled times and now serving as the religious and administrative centre of the region.

During the next two centuries civil wars intermittently broke out and the regional Governors became increasingly more powerful. At the end of 19th century, Trongsa Governor overcame all his rivals and soon afterwards recognized as the overall leader of Bhutan. The Governor of Trongsa, Sir Ugyen Wangchuck, was elected as the first King of Bhutan in 1907 by an assembly of representatives of the monastic community, civil servants and people. The country has now the system of constitutional monarchy.

Art & Culture of Bhutan

While Bhutan is one of the smallest countries in the world, its cultural diversity and richness are profound.

As such, strong emphasis is laid on the promotion and preservation of its unique culture. By protecting and nurturing Bhutan’s living culture it is believed that it will help guard the sovereignty of the nation.

Eating Habits
Traditional Bhutanese eating habits are simple and, in general, food is eaten with hands. Family members eat while sitting cross legged on the wooden floor with food first being served to the head of the household first.

It is usually women who serve the food and in most cases, the mother. Before eating, a short prayer is offered and a small morsel placed on the floor as an offering to the local spirits and deities. With modernization, eating habits have changed and in urban areas, people usually eat with cutlery whilst seated at a regular dining table.

Traditionally dishes were cooked in earthenware, but with the easy availability of modern goods, pots and pans have largely replaced their use. A typical Bhutanese meal consists of rice, a dish of Ema Datshi, the country’s favourite dish of chili and cheese, pork, beef curry or lentils.

Funeral
Death signifies re-birth or a mere passing on to a new life. In keeping with the traditions, elaborate rituals are performed to ensure a safe passage and a good rebirth.

The 7th, 14th, 21st and 49th days after a person’s death are considered especially important and are recognized by erecting prayer flags in the name of the deceased and performing specific religious rituals. While the deceased are normally cremated, funerary practices vary in few cases. In some parts of the country, people typically bury their dead while in some, they carry out ‘Sky Burials’, a process in which the deceased are prepared and left atop mountains to be devoured by vultures in a final act of compassion and generosity. Elaborate and ancient rituals are also conducted on the anniversary of the death with the erection of prayer flags. The relatives and people of the locality come with alcohol, rice or other sundry items to attend such rituals.

Birth
The birth of a child is always welcomed. In Bhutan extended family and guests are discouraged from visiting during the first three days after the birth.

On the third day, a short purification ritual is performed after which visitors are welcomed to visit the new born and mother. Bhutanese value children as progenitors of the future and therefore do not discriminate on the sex of the child. Traditionally various gifts are offered ranging from dairy products to cloth and money.

The child is not immediately named; this responsibility is usually entrusted to the head lama (Buddhist priest) of the local temple. The mother and child will also receive blessings from the local deity (natal deity) and it was traditional that the name associated with the deity is given. In some cases, the child is given the name of the day on which the child is born. Based on the Bhutanese calendar, a horoscope is written based on the time and date of the birth, this will detail the various rituals to be performed at different times in the life of the child and to an extent predict his or her future.

Marriages
Until just a few decades ago arranged marriages were common and many married among their relatives. In eastern Bhutan cross-cousin marriages were also once common, however, this practice is now becoming less common place among the literate masses and most marriages are based on the choice of the individuals.

Marriages are simple affairs and are usually kept low-key. However, elaborate rituals are performed for lasting unions between the bride and the bridegroom. As the religious ceremony comes to an end, parents, relatives and friends of the couple present the newlyweds with traditional offerings of scarves along with gifts in the form of cash and goods.

In the Western Bhutan, it was commonplace that the husband goes to live in his wife’s house after marriage while the practice in Eastern Bhutan is for the wife to move into the husband’s home. Of course, the newlyweds may also choose to live on their own. Divorce is also an accepted norm and carries no ignominy or disgrace within the country.

Bhutanese Dress
One of the most distinctive features of the Bhutanese is their traditional dress, unique garments that have evolved over thousands of years. Men wear the Gho, a knee-length robe somewhat resembling a kimono that is tied at the waist by a traditional belt known as Kera. The pouch which forms at the front traditionally was used for carrying food bowls and a small dagger. Today however it is more accustomed to carrying small articles such as wallets, mobile phones and Doma (beetle nut).

Women wear the Kira, a long, ankle-length dress accompanied by a light outer jacket known as a Tego with an inner layer known as a Wonju.

However, tribal and semi-nomadic people like the Bramis and Brokpas of eastern Bhutan generally wear clothing that differs from the rest of the Bhutanese population. The Brokpas and the Bramis both wear dresses woven either out of Yak or Sheep hair.

Bhutanese wear long scarves when visiting Dzongs and other administrative centers. The scarves worn vary in color, signifying the wearer’s status or rank. The scarf worn by men is known as Kabney while those worn by women are known as Rachus. .

The Rachu is hung over a woman’s shoulder and like the scarves worn by men, they too have specific rank associated with their color. Rachus are usually woven out of raw silk and embroidered with beautiful rich patterns.

Festivals
Bhutan is rich in cultural diversity and this richness is further enhanced by the wide variety of elaborate and colorful religious festivals that are celebrated throughout the country. Every village is known for their unique festival though the most widely known is the annual Tshechu, an annual religious festival.

As the Tshechu begins, the villagers and the general populace dress in their finest clothes and congregate at their local temples and monasteries where these festivals take place. Tshechus are usually occasions to mark important events in the life of the second Buddha, the Indian/Pakistani Tantric master known as Guru Rinpoche or the Precious Master. Various mask dances are performed together with songs and dances for three days on average.

These religious celebrations are lively, high-spirited affairs during which people share meals of red rice, spicy pork, Ema Datshi and Momos (pork/beef dumplings) whilst drinking the heady traditional rice wine known as Ara. These occasions provide the villagers with a respite from the hard labor of their day to day lives and gives the community an opportunity to catch up with family and friends.

Incentive Tours of Bhutan || Bhutan Incentive Tours

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